Keynote Speakers

Andrea Goldsmith

The Road Ahead for Wireless Technology: Dreams and Challenges

Abstract: Wireless technology has enormous potential to change the way we live, work, and play. Future wireless networks will support Gigabit per second multimedia communication between people and devices with high reliability and uniform coverage indoors and out. Software will create a virtual wireless network cloud, enabling resource management, seamless connectivity, and roaming across heterogeneous access networks, including WiFi and cellular systems. Wireless technology will also enable smart and energy-efficient homes and buildings, automated highways and skyways, and in-body networks for analysis and treatment of medical conditions. The shortage of spectrum will be alleviated by advances in cognitive radios, and breakthrough energy-efficiency algorithms and hardware will be employed to make wireless systems “green”. There are many technical challenges that must be overcome in order to make this vision a reality. This talk will describe what the wireless future might look like and some of the innovations and breakthroughs that are required to realize this vision.

Picture of Andrea GoldsmithBiography: Andrea Goldsmith is the Stephen Harris professor in the School of Engineering and a professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. She was previously on the faculty of Electrical Engineering at Caltech. She co-founded and serves as CTO of Accelera, Inc., which develops software-defined wireless network technology, and previously co-founded and served as CTO of Quantenna Communications Inc., which develops high-performance WiFi chipsets. She has previously held industry positions at Maxim Technologies, Memorylink Corporation, and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Goldsmith is a Fellow of the IEEE and of Stanford, and she has received several awards for her work, including the IEEE Communications Society and Information Theory Society joint paper award, the IEEE Communications Society Best Tutorial Paper Award, the National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lecture Award, the IEEE Wireless Communications Technical Committee Recognition Award, the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award. She is author of the book "Wireless Communications" and co-author of the books "MIMO Wireless Communications" and "Principles of Cognitive Radio," all published by Cambridge University Press. She received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from U.C. Berkeley.

Dr. Goldsmith is currently on the Steering Committee for the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, and has previously served as editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, the Journal on Foundations and Trends in Communications and Information Theory and in Networks, the IEEE Transactions on Communications, and the IEEE Wireless Communications Magazine. Dr. Goldsmith participates actively in committees and conference organization for the IEEE Information Theory and Communications Societies and has served on the Board of Governors for both societies. She has been a Distinguished Lecturer for both societies, served as the President of the IEEE Information Theory Society in 2009, founded and chaired the student committee of the IEEE Information Theory society, and currently chairs the Emerging Technology Committee and is a member of the Strategic Planning Committee in the IEEE Communications Society. At Stanford she received the inaugural University Postdoc Mentoring Award, served as Chair of its Faculty Senate, and currently serves on its Faculty Senate and on its Budget Group.

 

Nuria Oliver

 Small Devices for Big Impact

Abstract: There are almost as many mobile phones in the world as humans. The mobile phone is the piece of technology with the highest levels of adoption in human history. We carry them with us all through the day (and night, in many cases), leaving digital traces of our physical interactions. Mobile phones have become sensors of human activity in the large scale and also the most personal devices.

In my talk, I will present some of the work that we are doing at Telefonica Research in two related areas: (1) using mobile phones to have positive impact in education, health and communication; and (2) analyzing and understanding large-scale human behavioral data from mobile traces with the purpose of having positive social impact.

Picture of Nuria OliverBiography: Nuria Oliver is currently Scientific Director at Telefonica Research (Barcelona, Spain). She is responsible for the Multimedia, HCI, Mobile Computing, Big Data Mining & User Modeling Research areas. Nuria received the BSc (honors) and MSc degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the ETSIT at the Universidad Politecnica of Madrid (UPM), Spain, in 1992 and 1994 respectively. She received her PhD degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, in June 2000. From July 2000 until November 2007, she was a researcher at Microsoft Research in Redmond, WA. At the end of 2007, she returned to Spain to create and lead her research team within Telefonica Research.

Her research interests include mobile computing, big and personal data analysis, multimedia data analysis, context awareness, recommender systems, statistical machine learning and data mining, artificial intelligence, health monitoring, social network analysis, computational social sciences, and human computer interaction. She is currently working on the previous disciplines to build human-centric intelligent systems.

Nuria has written over 80 papers in international conferences, journals and book chapters. Her work has been widely recognized by the scientific community with over 6100 citations. Nuria has over 30 patent applications and granted patents. She is also in the program committee and a reviewer of the top conferences in her research areas (IJCAI, IUI, UMAP, ACM Multimedia, ICMI-MLMI, SocialComp, Interaccion, PervasiveHealth, MIR, LoCA, MMM, CVPR, Ubicomp, MobileHCI, ICCV, AAAI, etc...). She was program co-chair of IUI 2009 and of MIR 2010, general conference co-chair of UMAP 2011, industry-day co-chair of IJCAI 2011 and track co-chair of ACM WWW 2013, among others.

She believes in the power of technology to empower and increase the quality of life of people. She has received a number of awards, including a Rising Start Award by the Women's Forum for the Economy and Society (2009), MIT’s ‘TR100 Young Innovators Award’ (2004) and the First Spanish Award of EECS graduates (1994). Besides her scientific publications, she is very interested in making science available to the general public. She has been a technology writer for Tecno2000 magazine and ‘El Pais’ newspapers, among others. Her work has been featured on multiple newspapers, magazines, radio and TV stations both in Spain and the US. She has been featured in EL PAIS Sunday magazine as one of a few 'female directors in technology' (2012), named Rising Talent by the Women's Forum for Economy & Society (October 2009), one of the 'most influential young women in Spain' (MujerHoy Magazine, 2012), one of '100 leaders of the future ' by Capital Magazine (May 2009) and one of the 'Generation XXI: 40 Spanish youngsters that will make news in the Third Millenium ' by EL PAIS (2000).

She is proficient in multiple foreign languages and she studied classical ballet for 13 years. Her hobbies include traveling, cinema, art, classical music, yoga, Formula Dodge racing, dance and swimming.

 

Frank Fitzek

Network Coding: Black Magic or Magic Juice?

Abstract: This talk advocates network coding for communication networks and storage. The benefits of network coding for future trends such as 5G cellular networks, small cells, mobile clouds, software defined networks and distributed storage solutions are presented. The key features of this new technology, namely recoding and sliding window, are presented in detail. Furthermore some misunderstandings of the technology are discussed.

Picture of Frank FitzekBiography: Frank H. P. Fitzek is a Professor in the department of Electronic Systems, University of Aalborg, Denmark heading the Mobile Device group. He received his diploma (Dipl.-Ing.) degree in electrical engineering from the University of Technology - Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) - Aachen, Germany, in 1997 and his Ph.D. (Dr.-Ing.) in Electrical Engineering from the Technical University Berlin, Germany in 2002 and became Adjunct Professor at the University of Ferrara, Italy in the same year. He co-founded the start-up company acticom GmbH in Berlin in 1999. He has visited various research institutes including Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), VTT, and Arizona State University. In 2005 he won the YRP award for the work on MIMO MDC and received the Young Elite Researcher Award of Denmark. He was selected to receive the NOKIA Champion Award several times in a row from 2007 to 2011. In 2008 he was awarded the Nokia Achievement Award for his work on cooperative networks. In 2011 he received the SAPERE AUDE research grant from the Danish government and in 2012 he received the Vodafone Innovation price. His current research interests are in the areas of wireless and mobile communication networks, mobile phone programming, network coding, cross layer as well as energy efficient protocol design and cooperative networking.